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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 2:55 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
But the federal Housing Minister, Tanya Plibersek, said it was wrong to blame higher rental prices entirely on higher immigration. She said increased housing demand came from many sources, including higher divorce rates and older people staying longer in their own homes.

i czytamy dalej

"The immigration story is very important for economic development … it's not sensible to suggest then that immigration is the problem."

pomijam juz fakt, ze sprowadzajac 200,000 immigrantow nie martwiac sie o mieszkania dla nich, to lekkomyslnosc... ale zrzucanie winy, za brak mieszkan na staruszkow, to dowcip miesiaca... juz widze, jak dla rozwiazania problemu braku mieszkan, wprowadza zakaz rozwodow i przymusowej eutanazji po ukonczeniu 65 roku zycia....

GOSPODARKA, GLUPCZE!

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/ren ... 31255.html


Góra
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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 3:03 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
skoro nikt nie odpowiada, to zrobie troche sztucznego tloku... wlasnie zanurzam sie w porannej prasie, mamy piekny dzien, a informacje sa coraz bardziej radosne...


Monique Rozanes Torres Aguero of Buenos Aires had wanted to travel to Sydney, Australia, but ended up instead in the former coal and steel mill town of Sydney, Nova Scotia.

The mix-up, due to inattention while booking flights online, became evident when she boarded a small propeller plane in Halifax that would take her on the last leg of her journey.

But rather than make a fuss, Torres decided to stay and make the best of her trip.

"When things happen, you let them happen," she said through an interpreter.


zyczylbym kazdemu, takiej beztroski...

http://www.smh.com.au/news/travel/touri ... 66682.html


Góra
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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 5:01 am 
Mmis - czytamy ten sam portal. :P

Nie martw sie, nie jest to pierwszy turysta, ktory trafil do zlego Sydney.

A 'no worries mate' chyba znasz.


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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 5:42 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
Jasiek napisał(a):
Mmis - czytamy ten sam portal. :P

Nie martw sie, nie jest to pierwszy turysta, ktory trafil do zlego Sydney.

A 'no worries mate' chyba znasz.


uwazaj jasiek, bo jeszcze skonczymy na piwie...


Góra
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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 6:15 am 
To nam nie grozi. Z prostej przyczyny - nie pije alkoholu.


Góra
  
 
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PostNapisane: Cz wrz 25, 2008 7:41 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
Jasiek napisał(a):
To nam nie grozi. Z prostej przyczyny - nie pije alkoholu.



ufff... a juz sie zaczalem bac

:)


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PostNapisane: Pt wrz 26, 2008 6:47 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
Ms Gillard, who is Acting Prime Minister while Kevin Rudd attends the UN in New York, told Fairfax radio this morning she had tried marijuana while at university, but "didn't like it".

Opposition Leader Mr Turnbull admitted on ABC television last night to having smoked cannabis as a younger man but described it as "a mistake in my past".


oko za oko, zab za zab... teraz pora na zwierzenia homoseksualne panie i panowie politycy... nic tak nie zaskarbia przychylnosci wyborcow, jak bledy mlodosci...


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PostNapisane: Pn wrz 29, 2008 2:52 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
Australia May Resume Borrowing After 12 Years, Telegraph Says

Sept. 29 (Bloomberg) -- Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd may become the first leader in 12 years to borrow to fund infrastructure programs, the Daly Telegraph reported, without saying where it obtained the information.

Rudd wants to fund improvements in city and regional transport and discussed a plan to borrow with senior colleagues, including Infrastructure Minister Anthony Albanese, the newspaper said.

The Australian government hasn't borrowed in net terms since 1996, when former leader John Howard was elected and started paying off A$96 billion ($79.4 billion) in debt, the newspaper said. Australia was declared debt free in 2006, the Telegraph said.


a mialo byc tak dobrze... future fund pokrywa przeciez tylko zobowiazania emerytalne skabu panstwa (w zesztlym roku mial return of 1.5%.... moj pluszowy misiek mial wiekszy....)... ale przeciez mialo cos zostac i dla reszty....

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... =australia


Góra
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PostNapisane: Pn wrz 29, 2008 3:33 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): So sty 31, 2004 9:22 pm
Posty: 962
Pomijajac fakt ze nazwe gazety Bloomberg podaje z bledem, chcialbym tylko dodac ze dziennikarstwo Daily Telegraph jest mniej wiecej an poziomie polskiego magazynu dla pan - Viva.


Góra
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PostNapisane: Pn wrz 29, 2008 5:50 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
Posty: 579
Lokalizacja: europa
Krowa z karabinem napisał(a):
Pomijajac fakt ze nazwe gazety Bloomberg podaje z bledem, chcialbym tylko dodac ze dziennikarstwo Daily Telegraph jest mniej wiecej an poziomie polskiego magazynu dla pan - Viva.


nigdy nie uwazalem ich za zbyt rozgarnietych... ale z faktami nie dyskutuje... nawet jesli to sa fakty dziennikarskie

:)


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PostNapisane: Wt paź 07, 2008 3:46 am 
RED KANGAROO - staly bywalec

Dołączył(a): Cz sty 12, 2006 2:37 am
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Lokalizacja: europa
NIESTETY TO BEDZIE DLUGIE I BOLESNE

There are lots of people scratching their heads trying to understand how listed companies, owned by savvy shareholders, could allow managers to take their money, use it recklessly, then pay themselves a greater return than shareholders get.

If this sounds familiar to anyone living in NSW, it should. The taxpayers of NSW, like shareholders of Wall Street financial companies, have been taken for a ride.

If NSW were a company, we would be its shareholders. It is the people of NSW, after all, who provide taxes and pay for the bureaucracy and government. The State Government, like public companies, has an "agency problem". Similar to the managers who run companies on the behalf of shareholders, politicians run the state on the behalf of its people. That's "agency". But like managers, they have an incentive to run it for their own benefit instead. That's the problem.

Judging by the disastrous opinion polls, this is what's been happening. We are not happy with management. Trains, roads, hospitals, schools - all the goods our company makes are broken. And if that were not bad enough, it emerges that management - the NSW politicians responsible for shoddy services - are getting their bonuses and then some.

Morris Iemma wants a car, driver and secretary for life as reward for three years of controversial premiership. The former health minister Reba Meagher will get a handsome pension despite overseeing one hospital debacle after another.

Like some corporate managers who benefit from the upside of risk-taking but take no part in the downside, politicians accept the rewards of political office and even when they are kicked out by voters still have a lifetime of perks. Their performance plays no part in their compensation. And it doesn't end with ministers. Support staff and political lackeys all consume taxpayer-funded salaries and perks that bear no relationship to performance. This is impossible to justify at the best of times, but especially when plum political positions are awarded on the basis of backroom deals and personal loyalty rather than merit.

Australia rails against this sort of pork-barrelling internationally. We lecture our poorer Pacific neighbours for paying their politicians with slush funds and perks that cannot be justified by performance. About half our international aid effort goes into "governance" programs to fight featherbedding. Is this worth opposing only if it happens somewhere else?

Every day of every year, taxpayers spend millions of dollars supporting the personal activities of former politicians. It is money that individuals and families have worked hard for, saved and sacrificed for, and we are entitled to ask what value we get in return.

The public service in NSW has become a black hole into which 50 per cent of government revenues - our taxes - are sunk. And yet the State Government operates on management principles that would make most companies blush.


During the last election, inconvenient changes to Epping Road in Sydney were delayed until after the election so the effects would not be felt at the ballot box. Similarly, changes to the rail timetable at Ryde are being delayed until after the byelection. This is the cost of "agency". And it is rife in corporate and political life, except that when it comes to the government, people can't just sell their shares. The only remedy is to move to another state.

How did it get this bad?

The extensive system of political perks was introduced to lure the best and brightest into politics by compensating talented individuals for income forgone in other areas. The idea was that people who accomplished something in their own lives would then move into politics.

But it has not turned out that way. The system rewards length in office rather than results. The incentives are structured to invite politicians to do little to rock the boat, stay in office as long as possible and then collect a lifetime of rewards.

The first thing that must change is the idea that the public should pay for former politicians who don't provide any service. All out-of-office perks should end immediately.

In the corporate world, if a manager is sacked, they leave and find another job. The gravy train ends. The problem is that governments do not face such discipline. If they get sacked by the public, the gravy train rolls on for a lifetime. Individuals in government must be held to greater account for their performance in power.

Gaurav Sodhi is a researcher at the Centre for Independent Studies.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/opinion/star ... ntentSwap1


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